Transgender wrestler Mack Beggs survives first day of state finals

Mack Beggs right shakes hands with Morton Ranch's Chelsea Sanchez before competing in the girls Class 6A 110-pound title bout during the UIL state wrestling championships Saturday

Transgender wrestler Mack Beggs is booed after second straight state title win | Fort Worth Star-Telegram

Beggs's public criticism began when a female wrestler's father filed a lawsuit in 2017 in an attempt to prevent Beggs from competing against other girls, alleging her artificially elevated testosterone levels are unfair. There have been lawsuits filed attempting to bar him from competing against women, and even legislative action that almost passed the state congressional houses. In his case, it describes him as a girl, even though he started making the transition from female to male in freshman year. Beggs posed. "I can tell the state Legislature to change the policy, but I can't tell them to change it right now".

But Beggs is required by rules to compete as a girl against girls, even though he's previously said he would rather wrestle boys.

"He has so much respect for all the girls he wrestles", McNew said.

Beggs refused interviews after her state-championship win. "People think Mack has been beating up on girls".

"The UIL is not in the gender-determining business and schools don't want to be either", UIL deputy director Jamey Harrison told the Associated Press.

Beggs told the Dallas Morning News' Sports Day that she had been forced to compete against girls.

State law puts Beggs in an awkward position.

"Or if you want to do it, you can quit the sport. It has more to do with skill and discipline than strength".

The solitude allowed him to concentrate on the task ahead and perhaps shield him from attacks on social media and occasional insults from the stands - or even other wrestling mats - during meets.

"I wanted to come out on top, and in my heart-I feel like a champion", Beggs said.

Parents are reportedly concerned about the safety risk of their children competing with an athlete on steroids, with more than one opponent forfeiting against Beggs.

Jordan Gutierrez, a university student who attended lasts year's state championship, reflected the common campus politics that resonates from many progressive professors and LGBT groups across America's colleges and universities.

Beggs wants to wrestle in the NCAA and is entertaining a scholarship offer from an out of state school.

Although Beggs and his family have stated repeatedly that he would like to wrestle boys, the law does not yet allow it. Lets hope for a progressive change!

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