Lawmakers weigh in on Trump's proposal to ban 'bump stocks'

Protesters laid in front of the White House holding American flags and signs that read “Am I next?”

Protesters laid in front of the White House holding American flags and signs that read “Am I next?”

White House officials said the president will meet students, teachers and state and local officials to discuss ways of providing more school safety and address gun violence. "We must do more to protect our children", Trump said during the announcement of the DOJ directive at the White House. But White House deputy press secretary Raj Shah said in a statement on Monday that Trump spoke with Sen.

Trump's announcement came nearly a week after the shooting deaths of 17 people at a Florida high school.

Bump stocks were used by Stephen Paddock, the Las Vegas shooter believed to be responsible for the greatest mass shooting in modern American history, to kill dozens and injure hundreds in October.

The goal of bump stocks is to enable semi-automatic weapons to fire at speeds close to fully automatic guns. And if the Trump administration chose to issue regulations banning bump stocks, it would be up to federal courts to decide whether those regulations were legal or not.

President Trump signed a memorandum instructing the attorney general to regulate the use of bump stocks, effectively banning the use of the devices that can allow rifles to mimic automatic weapons.

Mr Trump added that he wanted to moved past "cliches and exhausted debates" to bring in security measures that will "actually work" - and said new regulations would be finalised "very soon".

The February 14 shooting in Florida has galvanised students across the country to rally in favour of stronger gun laws.

Prior to being elected, Trump earned the support of the National Rifle Association.

Trump has faced widespread calls for some kind of action following the deadly shooting at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida last week.

Former pupil Nikolas Cruz (19) has been charged with 17 counts of premeditated murder over the shootings on Valentine's Day.

The main action Mr Trump has taken on guns has been to sign a resolution blocking an Obama-era rule created to keep guns out of the hands of certain mentally disabled people.

"It's OK to obtain a gun, like a handgun, but not an assault rifle", she said, adding that she hoped Trump and Congress would issue laws to strengthen background checks, ban assault rifles and prevent people with mental problems from accessing guns.

A bipartisan legislative effort to ban bump stocks past year fizzled out.

His political base of Republican voters overwhelmingly disapprove of most gun control actions and the President has enjoyed the support of the NRA.

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