NASA released incredible images of dwarf planets

NASA probe “New Horizons” snaps farthest-ever photo from Earth

New Horizons probe captures images at record distance from Earth

Captured by NASA's New Horizons spacecraft, the images were gathered at a greatest distance from Earth than any in the history of mankind.

That image has held the record for the farthest ever taken away from Earth-until now.

"New Horizons has always been a mission of firsts - first to explore Pluto, first to explore the Kuiper Belt, fastest spacecraft ever launched", said New Horizons Principal Investigator Alan Stern of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado.

According to NASA, New Horizons is now the fifth spacecraft to fly beyond the outer planets of our solar system.

"New Horizons has always been a mission of firsts - first to explore Pluto, first to explore the Kuiper Belt, fastest spacecraft ever launched".

For a couple of hours, this New Horizons image of the so-called Wishing Well star cluster, snapped on December 5, 2017, was the farthest image ever captured by a spacecraft.

According to the press release, New Horizons is now back in hibernation mode and will reawaken on June 4 to begin preparations for a January 1, 2019 rendezvous with 2014 MU69, which is almost a billion miles beyond Pluto. This means that images taken at this point are at a distance of 40.9 Astronomical Units (AUs), or the equivalent of about 41 times the distance between Earth and the Sun. But they're arguably among the most awesome photographic images ever.

According to a statement by NASA, the probe snapped a false-color image of a group of stars known as "Wishing Well" on December 5, 2017 while it was 6.12 billion km away from Earth and en route to the Kuiper Belt, a circumstellar disk surrounding the solar system.

The mission also broke a record that has been stagnant since 1990, when the Voyager 1 spacecraft sent back a final capture of Earth before the cameras on the craft were lost.

According to NASA, New Horizons is healthy and is now in hibernation. That won't be happening with New Horizons. The craft is now on its way to Kuiper Belt to take pictures of the Kuiper Belt object (KBO) which was named 2014 MU69 on January 1st, 2019.

New Horizons recorded a picture of a star cluster taken from almost 4 billion miles away, breaking the previous record. To get there, New Horizons is trucking: It travels more than 700,000 miles (1.1 million km) a day. It will be the farthest planetary encounter in history.

In the course of its extended mission in the Kuiper Belt, the New Horizons team seeks to observe at least two-dozen other KBOs, dwarf planets and "Centaurs" - i.e. former KBOs that have unstable orbits that cause them to cross the orbit of the gas giants.

The kicker? That record is likely to be broken again within a matter of months.

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