Facebook Wants Your Nude Pics Now To Stop Revenge Porn Later

Facebook is trying to combat “revenge porn” by encouraging users to submit their nude

Facebook is trying to combat “revenge porn” by encouraging users to submit their nude

Antigone Davis, Facebook's head of global safety, said the system is being trialled in the UK, US, Australia and Canada. Facebook claims it won't store images or videos and will only be tracking a digital footprint, known as a hash, to prevent the content from being uploaded again by someone else. It uses "cutting-edge" technology to prevent resharing of the images on its platforms, which includes Messenger and Instagram.

Would you trust Facebook with your nude photos?

This imprint will then flag up through messenger and automatically stop it being shared on Facebook, Facebook Messenger and Instagram.

There are fears the images could be found before being deleted, intercepted on their way to Facebook, or people could get around the technology by simply resizing images.

Prof Clare McGlynn, from Durham Law School, said that the United Kingdom should establish a similar organisation to Australia's e-safety commission.

"With its billions of users, Facebook is one place where many offenders aggress because they can maximize the harm by broadcasting the nonconsensual porn to those most close to the victim".

She explained: "Revenge porn is becoming such a huge epidemic among young people, it's absolutely frightful and if there's any way to tackle it then we should take that seriously".

Inman Grant, the e-Safety Commissioner, told ABC Australia that the images wouldn't be stored on Facebook's servers, just the digital print.

Facebook is inviting users to submit their private pictures as part of a new pilot programme to tackle "revenge porn", The Guardian reports.

The unorthodox scheme is now being tested among Facebook's Australian users, but Britain, Canada and the United States are also expected to take part in the project.

It will then be up to the sender to delete the image.

In the pilot scheme, users complete an online form outlining their concerns on the e-safety commissioner's website - and it notifies Facebook of the situation.

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