Facebook Working On Method To Prevent Revenge Porn

Caption + Facebook is asking users to send the company their nude

Caption + Facebook is asking users to send the company their nude

In a rather unorthodox new method aimed at combating the issue of revenge porn, Facebook has asked it's Australian users to upload their own explicit photographs. They might then tell you to send the images to yourself on Messenger.

Facebook's Head of Global Safety, Antigone Davis, said the pilot is an industry first, and builds on the non-consensual intimate images tool announced by Facebook in April that uses cutting-edge technology to prevent the re-sharing of images on its platforms.

When you send your nude photo to Facebook, what exactly happens to it? Facebook then assigns that photo with a digital fingerprint called a "hash", that allows it to identify it and keep it from being posted instantly.

The new system is very much in its infancy and Facebook assures all users that none of the images are stored.

Facebook and other technology companies use this type of photo-matching technology where images are "hashed" to tackle other types of content including child sex abuse and extremist imagery. Facebook will save those images and hash the photos. In most cases Facebook disables the account that shared the image.

Facebook is working with an Australian government agency on the project. "My specialty is digital forensics and I literally recover deleted images from computer systems all day - off disk and out of system memory".

"They're not storing the image, they're storing the link and using artificial intelligence and other photo-matching technologies", Julie Inman Grant, the Australian eSafety Commissioner, told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Roughly four percent of US internet users have been victims of revenge porn, according to a 2016 Data & Society Research Institute report.

Users, who fear that their intimate photos could end up on Facebook, need to first file a report with Grant's office, which will then share it with Facebook.

In the pilot scheme, users complete an online form outlining their concerns on the e-safety commissioner's website - and it notifies Facebook of the situation.

"Revenge porn is a huge problem and Facebook could be held liable for it, so they are trying to do something".

"Save your money, here it is for free", she added, appending a blurry photo of a naked woman shown from the rear, purportedly Sia herself.

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